Panaeolus papilionaceus

(Also known as Panaeolus campanulatus)

Bell-Cap Panaeolus

Order Agaricales, Family Psathyrellaceae

CAP BELL-SHAPED, BROWN-GRAY

Cap:  2-5 cm wide; bell-shaped; brownish to grayish; cap edge often hung with toothlike veil remnants

GILLS GRAYISH THEN BLACKISH

Gills:  attached; broad; grayish then blackish; often mottled with white edges

STALK LONG, BRITTLE

Stalk:  6-14 cm long, 1-5 mm thick; brown-gray; brittle; often with gray fuzz

Ring:  gone in mature specimens, fragments on cap margin

SPORE PRINT BLACK

Spores 11-18.5 x 7.5-12 µm, elliptical, smooth, apical pore, dextrinoid

ON DUNG, MULCH

EDIBILITY UNKNOWN

Lookalikes:

P. semiovatus -- larger with ring on stalk

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The most common Panaeolus in most lawns is the haymower’s mushroom (P. foenisecii), which is smaller than P. campanulatus and grows between blades of grass in the yard.  P. campanulatus is not found as often in grass and is definitely not hallucinogenic.  (We have no reports of children eating it and banging their heads or being scared of loving mom.)  It is smaller than P. semiovatus, but has a darker cap and is often smaller.

Like most other Panaeolus species, this mushroom has mottled gills with white edges.  This means that the flat sides of the blade-like gills have lighter and darker zones, sort of like an irregular patchwork.  (This is caused by the sequential maturation of spores in the gills.)  The gill edge, which would correspond to the sharp edge of a blade, is often white.


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