Coprinellus disseminatus

(Also known as Coprinus disseminatus)

Fairy Bonnet

Order Agaricales, family Psathyrellaceae

CAP BELL SHAPED, DEEPLY PLEATED

Cap:  .5-2 cm wide; bell-shaped to convex; buff with honey-brown center; deeply pleated nearly to center

GILLS BECOMING BLACK BUT NOT INKY

Gills:  attached; wide-spaced; white to black, not inky

STALK WHITE, FRAGILE, WITH NO RING

Stalk:  1.5-4 cm long, .5 to 2 mm thick; hollow, smooth, fragile

SPORE PRINT BLACK

Spores 6.5-19 x 4-6 µm, elliptical, smooth, apical pore

GROWING ON CLUSTERS IN DECAYING WOOD; IN GRASSY AREAS

Usually near base of stumps, often in lawns.

EDIBILITY UNKNOWN, TOO FLIMSY TO MERIT EATING

Lookalikes:

Parasola plicatilis -- larger, flatter cap

Panaeolus species -- firmer caps, no pleats

Coprinus micaceous -- browner, larger

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE TO KNOW...

Urban beauty-seekers spend far too much time viewing flower gardens. No one wants to trash the attraction of flower-bed pansies or recommend kicking flowers the way many people kick mushrooms, but isn't it worthwhile to appreciate the diversity of natural beauties in the city?  Begin to broaden your vision by moving away from the flowers and finding the fairy bonnet mushroom in the cool grass. 

It's not worth eating, but—much like its cousin the Japanese parasol—it's worth finding and appreciating.


Comment

blog comments powered by Disqus